Making invisible voices visible in online EVAW campaigns

Online spaces are not free from violence against women and girls (VAWG) but, in this blog, Amy O’Donnell and Miranda Dobson discuss how specific online platforms, including Hollaback! are supporting EVAW (ending violence against women) work by providing spaces to report experiences of street harassment and promote solidarity.  Hollaback! recently launched in Oxfam’s city of origin in Oxford – making …

Women leading in the peace

According to World Bank estimates of September 2016, two billion people live in countries where development outcomes are affected by fragility, conflict, and violence. By 2030, the share of global poor living in fragile and conflict-affected situations is projected to reach 46 per cent. Caroline Sweetman, Editor of Gender & Development, introduces us to the theme of gender in fragile …

CLARA: How a livelihoods and risk assessment tool is supporting women’s economic empowerment

There are more than 3.3 million displaced people in Iraq. Women and girls, and their ability to participate in livelihoods, have been particularly affected by this displacement. In this blog Corrie Sissons explains how the Cohort Livelihoods and Risk Assessment (CLARA) tool has been informing programme design and liveli­hood initiatives that can safely seed longer-term recovery. hen a shock happens, …

1 in 3 women suffer violence, but it’s everyone’s problem

NEWS:  1 in 3 women are estimated to directly experience violence. In the Gender & Development’s latest journal, issues around violence against women and girls (VAWG) are explored as a central concern for development. Caroline Sweetman, Editor of Gender & Development, introduces the articles and their contributors.  Counting Dead Women is a blog and social media campaign that lists the …

Are the Sustainable Development Goals good news for women?

The 2015 Sustainable Development Goal agreement was a historic moment for development and for feminism. Much hope rests on the goals, but what will they really achieve, for people living in poverty, and for women in particular? Valeria Esquivel  and Caroline Sweetman introduce some of the analysis in the latest issue of the Gender & Development journal. Agenda 2030 and …

Gender and Development talks resilience

How are men and women affected differently by shocks and stresses, and how can a women’s rights approach be applied? Caroline Sweetman, Editor of the Gender & Development journal, introduces the resilience issue. ‘Keep calm and carry on’, a motto from the days of the Blitz in World War II, is currently having a revival, emblazoned across mugs and tea-towels. …

Why have sex and the city when you can have gender?

The new issue of the Gender & Development journal looks at women’s rights and the promotion of gender equality in the urban environment. Here G&D’s Editor, Caroline Sweetman, draws out some highlights from the issue. At some point in 2008 or 2009, more people were living in towns and cities than in rural areas, for the first time in history. …

Care – from motherhood and apple pie to human rights

Care work is a social good, but one that is all too often undervalued, unequal and under resourced. Here, Gender & Development editor Caroline Sweetman introduces the Care issue. It’s a little-remarked-on fact that Margaret Thatcher, the first woman Prime Minister in the UK, was the mother of twins.  When I had my own twins, I used to muse that the twin mother …

Monitoring, evaluation and learning: why it’s an activist’s best friend

Why is Gender & Development focusing on monitoring, evaluation and learning (MEL) this issue? Editor Caroline Sweetman explains how gender sensitive MEL can support women’s empowerment as well as reporting on it. Gender & Development turns 21 this year, and we’re celebrating by looking at a really hot topic: monitoring, evaluation and learning. There’s no mistake here – though on the face …

Vote no to women graduates! Getting education right for women

Education is a fundamental human right, but what’s needed to ensure a quality empowering education for all?  Gender & Development editor Caroline Sweetman introduces the Education issue. If you want to keep a whole segment of society oppressed, best make sure you prevent them getting an education. Less than 150 years ago, the British psychiatrist Henry Maudesley stated: “Vote no to women …