Four things we learnt in May

In May, we looked at the opportunities and dilemmas which technology is opening up for development and humanitarianism; new monitoring and evaluation initiatives; reducing the burden of unpaid care work, and research into South Africa’s environmental limits and social needs. Here, Cat Meredith presents four insights from the latest blog posts and publications. 1. ICTs are helping us to achieve …

Is South Africa operating in a safe and just space?

Oxfam’s doughnut model provides a framework for policy makers to envisage a safe and socially just space for humanity. What would this look like if applied to one of the world’s most unequal countries? Katherine Trebeck introduces the South Africa doughnut report. Our world faces twin challenges: delivering a decent standard of living for everyone, while living within environmental limits. …

Measuring impact: a marriage of numbers and stories

At Oxfam we’re committed to monitoring, evaluation, accountability and learning to make sure we are having the most positive impact we can on the lives of people living in poverty.  As part of this approach we need to find new and better ways of measuring our impact. Here, Anne Oudes, monitoring evaluation and learning advisor introduces the World Citizens Panel, …

Mobilizing community health volunteers in Nepal

Providing water and sanitation, and public health promotion to help communities stay safe, are key parts of Oxfam’s Nepal Earthquake response. Here Genevive Estacaan explains how Oxfam is training community health volunteers in Tundikhel camp, Kathmandu. Donate now  It’s been four weeks since the worst earthquake Nepal  has seen for 81 years. Another devastating earthquake struck on the 12th May. …

Sky-rocketing inflation, conflict and collapsed markets: South Sudan update

In December 2013 fighting broke out across South Sudan. Since then more than 1.5 million people have been internally displaced and over 500,000 have fled to Ethiopia, Kenya, Sudan and Uganda. Here Stella Madete, information and communications lead, provides an overview of the current situation on the ground and what Oxfam is doing. Donate now  Sky-rocketing inflation, conflict and collapsed …

Reaching the unreachable through SMS health messages in Somalia

Polio is a crippling and potentially fatal childhood disease which is close to being eradicated globally. When a fresh outbreak of the disease occurred in Somalia in 2013 urgent action was needed. Here Amy O’Donnell, ICT in programme lead, explains how Oxfam used mobile phones to raise awareness of the disease and help communities to protect themselves. Prior to May …

Lack of water and toilets making things worse for women in Nepal

Nisha Agrawal, CEO of Oxfam India, has just returned from a visit to Nepal after two devastating earthquakes hit the country. Here, she describes the situation on the ground, the challenges for the relief effort, and what we are doing to help the communities affected. Donate now  It has now been close to three weeks since Nepal was devastated by …

Harnessing the power of ICTs to help amplify voices in the Philippines

A recent case study on the issue of relocation in the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan utilised mobile data capture tools as part of the research process. What responsibilities come with using such tools and what benefits do they offer? ‘It’s humbling and powerful to hear your own voice so quickly.’ – Community feedback, the Philippines, February 2014 When an emergency strikes …

Oxfam and Visa team up for an innovative payment solution for disaster-affected communities

A partnership between Oxfam and Visa is providing financial access to disaster-affected communities in the Philippines. Here, Amy O’Donnell and Niña Espinola-Abogado explain how the Electronic Prepaid Solution (EPS) came into being and how the system works. Since the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan (local name: Yolanda), Oxfam in the Philippines has been looking for ways to improve the efficiency, security, …

Engineering in the Ebola response: We hadn’t been here before

Water and sanitation engineer Andy Clarke describes his experience of responding to the unprecedented challenge of the Ebola outbreak in Liberia. He explains why being able to adapt to people’s needs proved a key part of the response, allowing efforts to be focused in the areas where they would be most effective. A year on and the deadliest outbreak of Ebola …